Mondays in Microbiolgy

Theme: Evolutionary approaches to study antibiotic resistance

 

Date: 8 August 2022
Time: 15.00-16.30

Chair person: Associate professor, Rikke Louise Meyer 

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Evolution of β-lactam resistance along 26 years of chronic infection in a cystic fibrosis patient
Andrea M. Smania

Airway models to mimic Pseudomonas aeruginosa evolution
Filipa Simões

Short-Evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa upon interaction with the human airway
Antonella Colque

 


Andrea Smania
Professor of Advanced Molecular Genetics and Principal Investigator, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.

Andrea Smania leads the Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology and Bacterial Evolution at the National University of Córdoba (Argentina). Her research focuses on the molecular bases underlying bacterial adaptability studying different systems or factors by which cells can increase the mutation rate and acquire hypermutator states. She has ventured into studies addressing the involvement of hypermutability in biofilm formation, phenotypic diversification and antibiotic resistance. She is Head of the Department of Biological Chemistry “Ranwell Caputto” of the School of Chemical Sciences at UNC and the President of the Argentinean Society of General Microbiology. She is currently a visiting professor in Søren Molins lab at the DTU Biosustain in Copenhagen.


Filipa Simões
PostDoc researcher at the Department of Clinical Microbiology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.

Filipa Simões is currently in her 2nd year of postdoctoral research at the Infection Biology group, co-supervised by Helle K. Johansen and Søren Molin. Her background is in cell biology and Cystic Fibrosis, particularly in the modulation of inflammation, ion transport, and mucus hyperproduction in the airways, having obtained her PhD thesis at the University of Lisbon, Portugal. Now in the Infection Biology group, she studies the interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the human airway epithelium during chronic airway infections. To this end, she has been establishing an infection in vitro model that closely resembles the human airway epithelium physiology. This model is useful to characterize the colonization trajectories employed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to understand the mechanisms involved in the establishment of chronic infections, through transcriptomic analysis and innate immune responses.


Antonella Colque
PostDoc researcher at Infection Biology Group, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.

Antonella Colque is currently at her 2nd year of postdoctoral research at Infection Biology group, co-supervised by Helle K. Johansen and Søren Molin. Her background is in microbiology and evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens, having conducted her PhD thesis at Departamento de Química Biológica Ranwell Caputto in Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. Now at Johansen´s group, she works to understand the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction during chronic airways infections over years of human life-span. Current areas of interest include the study of common bacterial pathways towards persistency, human responses involved in the process, by using multi-omics, cutting-edge infection models as well as phenotypic approaches.